Remodel!

Last week was very exciting for the birds: their mews were remodeled!  Each bird’s enclosure received a plexiglass window in front and and open skylight. In addition to more natural light in the mews, the birds now have access to rain and snow, breezes, and even entertainment watching chickadees and cedar waxwings flutter in the trees above them.

You can see photos of construction and the birds’ reactions here!

mews

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Jess Grease

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This week I noticed Aldo’s jesses, the leather straps that hang from his legs, becoming more and more stiff. He seemed to notice, too, when he stamped his feet to move the leather to a more comfortable position. It was time to apply an oil to condition the leather. Luckily falconry suppliers make a conditioner specifically for this purpose: jess grease.

To condition the whole length of each jess, I need to remove the leash that binds the pieces of leather together and secures him to my glove when he is out of the mew. That means that if he tries to fly away during this process, he is more likely to escape. In case he gets away from me, I choose the smallest room with the lowest ceiling and fewest perches: the staff bathroom. Applying the jess grease is easy and I simply rub it in with my fingers. The grease will sink into the leather to keep it supple and waterproof for a few more weeks.

 

Time for a Trim

Each time I brought Carson the Red-tailed Hawk outside last week, I had to cringe a little. Her beak was overgrown and not only did it look bad, it was also getting in her way. It was so long that a piece of meat occasionally got speared by the hook and she had trouble getting it off. It was time for a trim.

Her last trim, or coping, was 10 months ago when she visited The Raptor Center last fall. While Aldo the American Kestrel’s beak grows so fast he needs a trim every 2 months, Carson’s beak grows slowly and requires less maintenance.

Coping a hawk beak feels like a piece of cake compared to a kestrel. Kestrels, as falcons, have specialized notches in their beaks that need to be shaped. Hawks conveniently have a smooth-shaped beak and I only had to concentrate on shortening the hook. We finished quickly and brought her back to her mew to enjoy half of a rat with her smooth, shortened beak.

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Language of Falconry

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Aldo’s equipment is literally “under my thumb.”

Some words used in falconry, like mew or jess, are very specific to raptors. Other terms have been adapted for use in our everyday lives. Considering falconry’s history going back thousands of years, it is not surprising to see these terms work their way into our language. These are just a few examples of common phrases rooted in falconry:

  • A bird that has eaten too much is “fed up” and lacks the motivation to hunt or work for the falconer, just like a person that is fed up and unwilling to cooperate.
  • Before and after a hunt, a falconer holds the bird’s equipment with his thumb to prevent the bird from flying away. The term “under your thumb” has expanded to mean anyone under your control.
  • Some falconry birds are trapped from the wild as adults. Called “haggard” birds, they are often caught during migration when they might be thin and disheveled from their flight, like a haggard human that looks a little rough around the edges.

 

 

Spring Cleaning

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In spring, I love to find wildflowers blooming, to wait for migrating birds to return, and (perhaps most of all) to connect the outdoor hose. Winter makes a frozen mess in the raptor mews that we try to clean with buckets of hot water, but we can’t get everything. The birds don’t seem to mind since they spend their time on perches, elevated above the muck. But it was clear to us they required a heavy spring cleaning. We spent a full morning this week rinsing, washing, scrubbing, raking, and disinfecting every surface of the mews. With the help of above-freezing temperatures and a little elbow grease, the mews are practically sparkling!

Sticks

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Carson holding on to one of her sticks.

Even through the ice and snow last week, birds can sense that it’s spring. There seem to be more osprey than we’ve seen in recent years in the Cable area and they are busy nesting. Over the course of two or three days I watched one pair’s nest-building progress on my daily commute. What started as a few tree branches dangling precariously from a utility pole quickly became a sturdy mass of sticks. It is similar in structure to bald eagle and red-tailed hawk nests. In red-tailed hawks, the male and female work together to collect sticks and weave them together into a nest lined with strips of bark, fresh plants, or dried vegetation.

Our red-tailed hawk, Carson, has also sensed the springtime urge to build. Noticing an uptick in her activity this spring, I decided to test her interest in nest building. I placed 5 sticks around her mew one night and wondered if she would touch them. I was surprised to see each stick had moved the next morning. Since then, she moves the sticks around nearly every day, and occasionally she gathers them on top of her platform as if waiting for more sticks to appear so she can make a decent-sized nest.

Bath time

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Last Saturday was finally warm enough for the birds to take a bath outside. When I gave Carson a pan of water, she hopped in as soon as I left the mew. I watched from the door for a moment, but she just looked back at me. I went back to my office to give her some privacy. An hour later I returned to check on her, expecting to see a dripping hawk after splashing and playing in the water. Instead I found Carson still standing in her water, completely dry except for her feet.

I continued to check on her throughout the morning and nothing changed. She simply stood in the water pan for three hours straight. I guess she decided that all she needed was a nice foot soak!