April Blizzard

A blanket of snow covered the mews after last weekend’s hefty snowstorm. Even Aldo’s mew, where the skylight is covered for the winter, had a dusting thanks to the strong winds carrying a taste of the blizzard inside. Carson and Theo got the full force of the storm through their open skylights. I saw footprints on the ground and ramp in Theo’s mew; in typical owl fashion, he didn’t seem to mind. Carson the Red-tailed Hawk chose to stay elevated on perches. Her snow piles remained untouched until I swept the ramp clear with my mitten. I wondered what she was thinking as I took this photo.

She might share the same attitude as most people that spent the April weekend shoveling. “Are you kidding me?”

Or does she appreciate the snowfall as a magnificent form of enrichment? “Isn’t this interesting!”

Or, perhaps more likely, she thought of more pressing matters. “So, when will my food be delivered?”

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Digger’s new view

The snakes and salamander returned to the Curiosity Center yesterday after weeks of construction. While a new wall went up, they were tucked away in the classroom, safe from all of the sawing, sanding, and painting. Plenty of work remains for the main exhibit, but they returned home once the Curiosity Center was put back together. For them, the move was easy. Digger, Emory, and Scuba got to rest in their travel crates while volunteers hefted glass terrariums from the classroom to the exhibit hall. Then heating pads had to be plugged in, light timers reset, rocks and branches rearranged, and water bowls filled. After all of that, I hope Digger enjoys her new view of the cheery orange wall and entryway!Diggers new view.JPG

Preening in the Sun

Sometimes I use the birds as an excuse to get out of my office, stretch my legs, and bask in the sun. I figured Aldo would be a willing accomplice as he joined me this week in a sunny spot. If Museum Director Deb had walked by, I might have justified this basking as necessary enrichment for Aldo, but I think those springtime rays were just as enriching for me. It also gave Aldo the perfect opportunity to preen those hard-to-reach areas under his wings!

Aldo and Mollie

Over the past few weeks, Aldo has quickly made friends with the Museum’s Curator Naturalist, Mollie Kreb. We had a bit of a time-crunch when she started in February since I planned to leave two weeks later for a conference in California.

She worked with the birds daily, quickly learning how to prep food, use raptor equipment, and weigh Aldo. Luckily Aldo seemed quite happy to hop on Mollie’s glove and I didn’t doubt that the birds – and Mollie – would be just fine when I was traveling. She will continue working with the birds so they know another familiar face when I’m out of town.

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Foot Tuck

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I am always looking for signs that the birds are relaxed. Any time their head is down (while eating) or covered (while preening their wings or sleeping), they are more vulnerable to a threat. A predator might take that opportunity to launch a surprise attack, so they only risk covering their eyes when they feel safe. Other comfort behaviors, like Carson’s foot tucked in the photo, indicate that they are comfortable and and not worried about their surroundings.

Sleeping

I went outside to check on the birds one last time before I went home for the day. I peered into Carson’s mew and saw her staring back at me as usual. But this time, she quickly looked away to snuggle her beak back behind her wing to fall asleep. I don’t often see the birds so sleepy, so I was excited to get her “bedtime” on video!

 

Perch Variety

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Aldo tried out two new perches this week to spice up his time indoors. First he sampled a flat block perch for an afternoon, then he tried out a small hemlock branch that I bent over his normal perch. New substrates keep him engaged, test his balance, and promote foot health. Wild raptors perch on a variety of branches, wires, fence posts, and ledges, constantly changing how weight is distributed on their feet. Captive birds also need options; otherwise they risk developing pressure sores that can develop into swelling called bumblefoot. Aldo has one favorite perch, but it is beneficial to switch things up every once in a while.